Home Away From Home

This latest book adaption is great fun and a classic Tim Burton piece. I had wanted to read Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children  by Ransom Riggs since I hear of it. I read the first two chapters and then promptly lost it; I was so sad! So I am unable to tell you how close it is to the book. But that’s fine because I love this whimsical film in its own right.

After Jake’s grandfather dies, he discovers clues to a mystery that spans space and time. Following an address from a post card sent to his grandfather, Jake finds Miss Peregrine and her Home for Peculiar Children. As he learns about the residents and their unusual abilities, he also learns about the dark side of being peculiar. His friends are trapped in a time loop to keep them safe from the Hallows, a malicious enemy who kills peculiars for everlasting humanity. Jake is the key to their survival but can he make the sacrifices required of him?1280_miss_peregrines_home_for_peculiar_children_eva_green

The story follows the children with the titular Peregrine taking a back seat to their story. This is a coming of age tale about a group of children who never age. Asa Butterfield manages to make Jake a real person (so much more than he ever did for Ender but that’s another thing entirely). Ella Purnell with gorgeous Targaryen hair leads the group with love and respect as best an older sister good. But this doesn’t mean the adults don’t make their mark. Eva Green, Samuel Jackson, Rupert Everett, Judi Dench, Allison Janey and Terence Stamp all add to the world with character with characters as varied and unusual as the children. In fact, I have decided that Jackson does his best work as a villain.

The film is classic Burton. Dark but funny. Serious but sweet. HIs as his signature style wraps around the peculiar children and their world. His visual palate is perfect partner for the world based on trick and creepy photography. The films deliver exactly what I had imagined from reading the two chapters of the book.

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children is classic Burton and deserves a spot in your DVD collection. It’s a fantastical story that will be fun to relive over and over.

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All We Are Are Spectres in the Wind

Explosions, car chases and gun fights are a plenty as Bond slays an octopus and saves the word. Spectre is a fun ride with a succinct focus that tidily wraps up the Daniel Craig era.
Bond finds a link to an underground organization after a visit to Mexico city where his destruction makes the national news. This is critical mistake for MI6- the 00 Project is threatening to be disband as MI-6 takes over with a new system that watches everyone 24/7. Bond takes no head when, by the help of Q, he sneaks off toff after being grounded by the newest M. But what they don’t know that the previous M left a clue to her death behind. Bond will stop at nothing to avenge her and get to the bottom of Spectre and its intersection in his life.

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The is what viewers love about bond: foreign beauties, ridiculous stunts, and snappy one liners. But t the iconic lines of James Bond fall from Craig’s mouth like stale bread. It is hard to tell if it is the writing or the acting. Craig’s distaste at ever being Bond again is a good thing. This means we don’t habv to watch him an his route performance. As usual, he shows off his body but does nothing on the acting front. Christopher Waltz is great as the typical over acting villain, and Dave Batista has become this generations Tor Johnson. The true standout performance is Ben Whishaw as Q. He is witty, brave and often the humorous release for the film. Whinshaw is the best casting choice since Dame Judi Dench as M.
The plot is thin and shake which is typical of many of the films and the twist at the end you will have seen coming since early in the film. But it truly doesn’t matter. Bond films are known for the thrilling chase scenes and fights. Add in a shake of humor and the movie continues to entertain.
Happily, writers conclude the stories of the last three films forming a common thread for Craig’s time as Bond. This fourth film ties all of them together. Villains past and present have a story that is wrapped in a nice shine bow connecting some of the weaker movies together. Bond finally comes face to the face to the man he has been truly hunting since Casino Royale ending the latest leg of Bond films.
Walking out of the theater leaves a better taste in Skyfall (even if the theme song doesn’t ,measure up). Viewers and Bond get closure as the franchise looks to the future. Until the studio decides on what is next for fond, Spectre is a nice little meal to tide you over.