Just Watch Me

Just Watch Me is Jeff Lindsay’s latest novel after bidding his infamous character Dexter Morgan behind
Riley Wolfe gets his thrills from thefts and disguises. But Riley isn’t your typical con man; he’s not running Ponzi scheme or such. Riley goes big, ripping a statue right from its anchors at its unveiling. But he’s getting bored; the thrill diminishes after each scheme. Then Riley finds his big get: the Crown Jewels of Iran. It will take all great foresight and a master talent of disguise to make this master robbery work; Riley salivates at the challenge.
This book is an easy read. And I don’t mean it’s simply written or flippant. Lindsay pulls you in and wraps you into the scheme too. The reader is a passive by standard that is privy to each thrill and twist of Riley’s brain. Lindsay also ensures that the reader starts to understand a little about the way he is. His antihero isn’t just some evil cliché. I was just-watch-mequite impressed with the imagination and thought that went into this book flipping each page as fast as I could.
I only have two issues with the book. the first concerns a major point in his robbery; I just couldn’t spend disbelief enough to see that it would work. The second is that I don’t like Riley, But I am mesmerized by the people he becomes. I shouldn’t call this an issue as I don’t think we are supposed to like Riley right off. Instead, we are to respect the talent it takes to pull off his cons.
The author leaves Dexter behind except for one misstep: the main character talks about the “dark” that overtakes him when he kills. Luckily, it doesn’t follow the main story but the side plot of Riley’s childhood. Other than that, Riley stands on his own without being too much like Dexter. Riley’s maladjustedness focuses more on deceit and theft for a set of all new adventures (I’m sure Riley Wolfe will ride again).
Over all, Lindsay lures you away from the Dexter legacy, allowing Riley Wolfe to stand on his own two feet. The author creates a new kind of adventure following a sociopath with a talent for extravagant cons. While, I’m not fond of Riley as a character, I can’t help but be amazed at what he pulls off when he sets his mind to it.

 

Publication Date: December 3

I received an arc from the publisher; all opinions are my own.

She’s Out

After I finished the sequel to Widows, I swore I was done with the series. But Lynda La Plante pulled me with a great concept. Dolly has done her time in prison, done good for other and has plans to open a home for foster children. Meanwhile, Shirley Miller {21ED394E-BE5D-4562-8BBD-FDE33210E75E}Img400brother is plotting revenge for her death. Sadly, the story quickly changes. Dolly gets the raw end ad everything with the brother Mike falls apart. You end up with a heist story that makes no sense and is written poorly.
She’s Out is written like TV where short scenes can convey a lot of info and keep interest. But books can’t just be three lines about what’s going on in one area and then move on to another. We need something to sink our teeth in. This style runs the ending. The heist is sped through quickly and the reader doesn’t have time to soak in what’s going on. It loses any excitement or thrill. The ending is just sad and no way satisfying.
That being said, I enjoyed getting to know the characters. The women aren’t just cookie cutter stereotypes and the author pushes their boundaries. That works well. In fact, it’s the best part. I honesty wanted more for each character that they ever got in the ending.
She’s Out isn’t my style of heist stories but I can see how it good TV when the author originally created the content.

Published: Oct 29
I received an ARC through NetGalley; all opinions are my own.