Good Girls Lie

I was happily surprised by how much I enjoyed Good Girls Lie. Typically, I find boarding school stories droll but this was a truly exciting thriller. Ellison_GoodGirlsLie_FinalCover
After the devastating loss of her parents, Ash Carlisle leaves her home in England to attend a prestigious all girl boarding school in the United States. Goode comes with all the typical high school drama but there is more lurking behind the corners of this historic school. Ash tries to keep her head down but when her roommate dies horrifically, Ash knows there will be no escape from her past.
I was highly engaged on this story. It’s not your typical boarding school story or even a mean girl thriller. Each chapter egged me on trying to guess what each character was hiding. I loved guessing even when I was wrong and loved, even more, the twist I never saw coming. I was disappointed that in the end, the story ended so quickly from its build up. Luckily, each character is given a conclusion keeping away from pesky loose ends that annoy me so as a reader.

JT Ellison Author Photo credit Krista Lee Photography - vertical

J.T. Ellison

The writing isn’t overly complex but J.T. Ellison gives the overtures needed to keep the reader engaged. The only true issue is that the perspectives and narration changes between chapters in a jarring way. The goal is clearly to hide certain aspects of the characters and keep the reader from knowing everything at once, but there is one perspective in particular that causes me to stop reading because it clashes and I have to realize it’s an entirely different narration even though it’s so similar to another.
Good Girls Lie is more than just your typical girl’s boarding girl story. Packed with deceit and twists, Good Girls Lie is tense story about identity and the way we react to our environment.

Publication Date: December 31, 2019

I received an ARC from the publisher; all opinions are my own.

The Ronan Scrolls

The Ronan Scrolls is a companion piece to the Dragon Master Trilogy that gives enduring a look into the scientific side of magic.
Ronan the Traveler seeks answers after his brother is burned at the stake for seeing the future. In a world where dragons roam and witches are real, even having the sight is seen as madness and dangerous. But Ronan cannot agree. He will travel all of Antebellum knowing his brother cannot be the only one who can see the future. The scrolls herein relay that story.47870311._SX318_
I truly enjoyed the Ronan scrolls. Ronan believes he can use intellect to understand magic and this unique perspective endears you to him. Like many characters of the same situation, you do not pity him for the loss of his brother, instead, you cheer on his adventure to help himself deal with his own pain. Whether or not you should look at magic scientifically is a question presented here but you absolutely want Ronan to find the answer because surely there is life is a mix of magic and science.
Katie Cross chooses a fun narrative structure to tell Ronan’s adventures. Past an introduction, the novella is truly Ronan’s tale, each portion written by the character himself. While it limits the whole perspective in some ways that might be fur frustrating, it is that frustration one needs to understand to truly appreciate Ronan’s journey. Cross does well with the “diary” form of writing moving the story along without giving too much away.
While this reads best for those who are familiar with previous entries in the series such as Flame and Flight, this is also an intriguing novella that can be a bridge for new readers. I encourage readers interested in magic to dip their toes in the Dragon Master world with this work and then see the world bloom in the full novels. For avid fans, this is a must.
Overall, The Ronan Scrolls is a refreshing addition to Cross’s work looking at magic with a scientific slant.

 

Publication Date: December 18

I received a copy from the author for review; all opinions are my own.

Trace of Evil

trace-of-evilTrace of Evil gets a solid 3.5 stars. I enjoyed the story but any of the writing elements could be tightened.
Natalie is a rookie cop working on her first murder investigation, a collection of cold cases. But when one of her friends is killed in cold blood, Natalie must navigate the reality of the world without forgetting those that suffered in the cold cases.

I loved the story. I was pulled in from the moment they celebrate Grace’s death anniversary. Natalie was a character that didn’t hide much so you were able to really get into her head. The story then unfolds with witchcraft, abuse of nature, murder, and lies. How Natalie deals with each of these are shadowed by Grace so I was glad to see here come full circle by the end of the book.

The writing itself needs some work. The biggest issue is the pacing. The author throws in way too much background information slows the story and keeps the suspense for building up. I skimmed over many paragraphs because I wanted to stay with the rhythm. The other issue was there was a lot of creative freedom that ignored police procedure. A classic example is Natalie handling voodoo without gloves even though she knows it is evidence.
Alice Blanchard has a lot of potential. I want to read more of her work and see her grow into an author.

 

Publication Date: Dec. 3

I received an ARC through teh publisher; all opinions are my own.

Just Watch Me

Just Watch Me is Jeff Lindsay’s latest novel after bidding his infamous character Dexter Morgan behind
Riley Wolfe gets his thrills from thefts and disguises. But Riley isn’t your typical con man; he’s not running Ponzi scheme or such. Riley goes big, ripping a statue right from its anchors at its unveiling. But he’s getting bored; the thrill diminishes after each scheme. Then Riley finds his big get: the Crown Jewels of Iran. It will take all great foresight and a master talent of disguise to make this master robbery work; Riley salivates at the challenge.
This book is an easy read. And I don’t mean it’s simply written or flippant. Lindsay pulls you in and wraps you into the scheme too. The reader is a passive by standard that is privy to each thrill and twist of Riley’s brain. Lindsay also ensures that the reader starts to understand a little about the way he is. His antihero isn’t just some evil cliché. I was just-watch-mequite impressed with the imagination and thought that went into this book flipping each page as fast as I could.
I only have two issues with the book. the first concerns a major point in his robbery; I just couldn’t spend disbelief enough to see that it would work. The second is that I don’t like Riley, But I am mesmerized by the people he becomes. I shouldn’t call this an issue as I don’t think we are supposed to like Riley right off. Instead, we are to respect the talent it takes to pull off his cons.
The author leaves Dexter behind except for one misstep: the main character talks about the “dark” that overtakes him when he kills. Luckily, it doesn’t follow the main story but the side plot of Riley’s childhood. Other than that, Riley stands on his own without being too much like Dexter. Riley’s maladjustedness focuses more on deceit and theft for a set of all new adventures (I’m sure Riley Wolfe will ride again).
Over all, Lindsay lures you away from the Dexter legacy, allowing Riley Wolfe to stand on his own two feet. The author creates a new kind of adventure following a sociopath with a talent for extravagant cons. While, I’m not fond of Riley as a character, I can’t help but be amazed at what he pulls off when he sets his mind to it.

 

Publication Date: December 3

I received an arc from the publisher; all opinions are my own.